The Basics of Wagering 2017-03-27T14:12:37+00:00

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Understanding the bets of racing is not difficult! This section contains all the basics.

WIN A horse bet to win must cross the finish line first.

PLACE A horse bet to place must cross the finish line either first or second. This bet is less risky but also normally pays less than a winning win wager on the same horse.

SHOW Any horse bet to show must finish either first, second, or third. Again, this wager is not as risky but will usually pay less than either a win or place wager on the same horse.

EXACTA The object is to correctly select the first two horses across the finish line in the exact order. For example, if you placed a “2-3” exacta, the #2 must win the race and the #3 must finish second. This is more difficult than any win, place or show wager but will reward with a higher payoff.

Exactas can be BOXED or WHEELED

QUINELLA The quinella is similar to the exacta. The object is to select the first two horses across the finish line, but in any order. If you placed a “3-6” quinella, the race must finish either 3-6 or 6-3. Either way, as long as the #3 and #6 both finish in the top two, this wager is a winner. The quinella price will on average pay about half of the exacta price. Quinellas can be BOXED or WHEELED.

TRIFECTA The trifecta is basically just an extension of the exacta. The object of a trifecta is to select the first three horses across the finish line in the exact order. An example trifecta would be “2-3-6”. The #2 must win, the #3 must finish second, and the #6 must finish 3rd in that exact order. Trifectas can be BOXED or WHEELED.

SUPERFECTA A winning superfecta must select the first four horses across the finish line in the exact order. Superfectas are one of the most difficult wagers to hit but routinely pay hundreds and often thousands of dollars. Superfectas can be BOXED or WHEELED.

DAILY DOUBLE The object is to correctly select which horses will win two consecutive races. Take for example a 6-3 daily double placed in the first race. The #6 must win the 1st race and the #3 must win the 2nd race. Daily Doubles can be WHEELED.

PICK-3 Correctly select the winners of three consecutive races. A Pick-3 can be WHEELED.

PICK-4 Correctly select the winners of four consecutive races. A Pick-4 can be WHEELED.

PICK-6
Correctly select the winners of six consecutive races. The Pick-6 is the most difficult wager in horse racing. It is also perhaps the most lucrative with payoffs in the 10’s and 100’s of thousands of dollars routinely. A Pick-6 can be WHEELED.

Boxing numbers in an exacta bet means that all numbers chosen are put in every possible combination to provide a greater possibility of correctly selecting the first two finishers.

If the numbers 1, 2, and 5 are boxed, the combinations of 1-2, 1-5, 2-1, 2-5, 5-1, and 5-2 are covered.

As long as the first two finishers involve the numbers 1, 2, or 5, the boxed ticket is a winner. The more numbers used in a box, the greater the number of possibilities covered. However, the more numbers boxed, the greater the cost to cover the wager.

# of choices
# of combinations
$ amount of bet
Cost of bet
2
2
$1 ($2)
$2 ($4)
3
6
$1 ($2)
$6 ($12)
4
12
$1 ($2)
$12 ($24)
5
20
$1 ($2)
$20 ($40)
6
30
$1 ($2)
$30 ($60)
7
42
$1 ($2)
$42 ($84)
8
56
$1 ($2)
$56 ($112)
9
72
$1 ($2)
$72 ($144)
10
90
$1 ($2)
$90 ($180)
11
110
$1 ($2)
$110 ($220)
12
132
$1 ($2)
$132 ($264)
13
156
$1 ($2)
$156 ($312)
14
182
$1 ($2)
$182 ($364)

A simple rule to remember to compute the cost of a boxed exacta wager would be as follows:
the number of horses to be boxed MULTIPLIED by the next lowest number MULTIPLIED by the dollar amount of the wager. EXAMPLE: A five-horse exacta box for $3 would be computed 5 (number of horses to be boxed) x 4 (next lowest number) x 3 dollar amount of the wager) = $60.

Boxing numbers in a quinella bet means that all numbers chosen are put in every possible combination to provide a greater possibility of correctly selecting the first two finishers. If the numbers 1, 2, and 5 are boxed, the combinations of 1-2, 1-5, and 2-5 are covered. As long as the first two finishers involve the numbers 1, 2, or 5, the boxed ticket is a winner. The more numbers used in a box, the greater the number of possibilities covered. However, the more numbers boxed, the greater the cost to cover the wager.

# of choices
# of combinations
$ amount of bet
Cost of bet
2
1
$2
$2
3
3
$2
$6
4
6
$2
$12
5
10
$2
$20
6
15
$2
$30
7
21
$2
$42
8
28
$2
$56
9
36
$2
$72
10
45
$2
$90
11
55
$2
$110
12
66
$2
$132
13
78
$2
$156
14
91
$2
$182

A simple rule to remember to compute the cost of a boxed quinella wager would be as follows:
number of horses to be boxed MULTIPLIED by the next lowest number DIVIDED by 2 ( because each bet is a combination ) MULTIPLIED by the dollar amount of the wager. EXAMPLE: A five-horse quinella box for $3 would be computed 5 (number of horses to be boxed) x 4 (next lowest number) DIVIDED BY 2 (because each bet is a combination) x 3 (dollar amount of the wager) = $30.

Boxing numbers in a trifecta bet means that all numbers chosen are put in every possible combination to provide a greater possibility of correctly selecting the first three finishers. If the numbers 1, 2, and 5 are boxed, the combinations of 1-2-5, 1-5-2, 2-1-5, 2-5-1, 5-1-2, and 5-2-1 are covered. As long as the first three finishers involve the numbers 1, 2, and 5, the boxed ticket is a winner. The more numbers used in a box, the greater the number of possibilities covered. However, the more numbers boxed, the greater the cost to cover the wager.

# of choices
# of combinations
$ amount of bet
Cost of bet
3
6
$1 ($2)
$6 ($12)
4
24
$1 ($2)
$24 ($48)
5
60
$1 ($2)
$60 ($120)
6
120
$1 ($2)
$120 ($240)
7
210
$1 ($2)
$210 ($420)
8
336
$1 ($2)
$336 ($672)
9
504
$1 ($2)
$504 ($1008)
10
720
$1 ($2)
$720 ($1440)
11
990
$1 ($2)
$990 ($1980)
12
1320
$1 ($2)
$1320 ($2640)
13
1716
$1 ($2)
$1716 ($3432)
14
2184
$1 ($2)
$2184 ($4368)

A simple rule to remember to compute the cost of a boxed trifecta wager would be as follows:
the number of horses to be boxed MULTIPLIED by the next lowest number MULTIPLIED by the next lowest number MULTIPLIED by the dollar amount of the wager. EXAMPLE: A five-horse trifecta box for $3 would be computed 5 (number of horses to be boxed) x 4 (next lowest number) x 3 (next lowest number) x 3 (dollar amount of the wager) = $180.

Boxing numbers in a superfecta bet means that all numbers chosen are put in every possible combination to provide a greater possibility of correctly selecting the first four finishers. If the numbers 1, 2, 3, and 5 are boxed, the 24 possible combinations of those numbers are covered. As long as the first four finishers involve the numbers 1, 2, 3, and 5, the boxed ticket is a winner. The more numbers used in a box, the greater the number of possibilities covered. However, the more numbers boxed, the greater the cost to cover the wager.

# of choices
# of combinations
$ amount of bet
Cost of bet
4
24
$1 ($2)
$24 ($48)
5
120
$1 ($2)
$120 ($240)
6
360
$1 ($2)
$360 ($720)
7
840
$1 ($2)
$840 ($1680)
8
1680
$1 ($2)
$1680 ($3360)
9
3024
$1 ($2)
$3024 ($6048)
10
5040
$1 ($2)
$5040 ($10008)
11
7920
$1 ($2)
$7920 ($15840)
12
11880
$1 ($2)
$11880 ($23760)
13
17160
$1 ($2)
$17160 ($34320)
14
24024
$1 ($2)
$24024 ($48048)


A simple rule to remember to compute the cost of a boxed superfecta wager would be as follows:

the number of horses to be boxed MULTIPLIED by the next lowest number MULTIPLIED by the next lowest number MULTIPLIED by the next lowest number MULTIPLIED by the dollar amount of the wager. EXAMPLE: A five-horse superfecta box for $1 would be computed 5 (number of horses to be boxed) x 4 (next lowest number) x 3 (next lowest number) x 2 next lowest number) x 1 (dollar amount of the wager) = $120.

Wheeling a selection in an exacta bet means wagering that selection with all other betting choices in order to cover all possibilities of finish. If the selection is the winner, the wheeled exacta bet is a winner. The greater the number of betting choices, the greater the cost of covering the wager.

# of choices
# of combinations
$ amount of bet
Cost of bet
2
2
$1 ($2)
$2 ($4)
3
3
$1 ($2)
$3 ($6)
4
4
$1 ($2)
$4 ($8)
5
5
$1 ($2)
$5 ($10)
6
6
$1 ($2)
$6 ($12)
7
7
$1 ($2)
$7 ($14)
8
8
$1 ($2)
$8 ($16)
9
9
$1 ($2)
$9 ($18)
10
10
$1 ($2)
$10 ($20)
11
11
$1 ($2)
$11 ($22)
12
12
$1 ($2)
$12 ($24)
13
13
$1 ($2)
$13 ($26)
Key-wheeling in a trifecta bet means selecting a key horse in a fixed position, usually first, and
wheeling any number of other horses in multiple combinations to finish in the remaining positions, usually second and third. If the 1 is key-wheeled with the 2, 3, and 5, the combinations of 1-2-3,
1-2-5, 1-3-2, 1-3-5, 1-5-2, and 1-5-3 are covered. As long as the 1 is the winner and any combination of the numbers 2, 3, and 5 are second and third, the key-wheeled wager is a winner. The more numbers used with the key-wheeled selection, the greater the number of possibilities covered. However, the more numbers used, the greater the cost to cover the wager.

# of choices
# of combinations
$ amount of bet
Cost of bet
2
2
$1 ($2)
$2 ($4)
3
6
$1 ($2)
$6 ($12)
4
12
$1 ($2)
$12 ($24)
5
20
$1 ($2)
$20 ($40)
6
30
$1 ($2)
$30 ($60)
7
42
$1 ($2)
$42 ($84)
8
56
$1 ($2)
$56 ($112)
9
72
$1 ($2)
$72 ($144)
10
90
$1 ($2)
$90 ($180)
11
110
$1 ($2)
$110 ($220)
12
132
$1 ($2)
$132 ($264)
13
156
$1 ($2)
$156 ($312)

A simple rule to remember to compute the cost of a key-wheeled trifecta wager would be as follows:
the number of horses to be boxed with the keyed selection MULTIPLIED by the next lowest number MULTIPLIED by the dollar amount of the wager. EXAMPLE: A key-wheeled trifecta using 4 choices with the key-wheeled selection for $2
would be computed 4 (the number of horses boxed with the key-wheeled selection) x 3 (next lowest number) x 2 (dollar amount of wager) = $24.

Key-wheeling in a superfecta bet means selecting a key horse in a fixed position, usually first, and wheeling any number of other horses in multiple combinations to finish in the remaining positions, usually second, third, and fourth. If the 1 is key-wheeled with the 2, 3, and 5, the combinations of 1-2-3-5, 1-2-5-3, 1-3-2-5, 1-3-5-2, 1-5-2-3, and 1-5-3-2 are covered. As long as the 1 is the winner and any combination of the numbers 2, 3, and 5 are second, third, and fourth, the key-wheeled wager is a winner. The more numbers used with the key-wheeled selection, the greater the number of possibilities covered. However, the more numbers used, the greater the cost to cover the wager.

# of choices
# of combinations
$ amount of bet
Cost of bet
3
6
$1 ($2)
$6 ($12)
4
24
$1 ($2)
$24 ($48)
5
60
$1 ($2)
$60 ($120)
6
120
$1 ($2)
$120 ($240)
7
210
$1 ($2)
$210 ($420)
8
336
$1 ($2)
$336 ($672)
9
504
$1 ($2)
$504 ($1008)
10
720
$1 ($2)
$720 ($1440)
11
990
$1 ($2)
$990 ($1980)
12
1320
$1 $2)
$1302 ($2640)
13
1716
$1 ($2)
$1716 ($3432)


A simple rule to remember to compute the cost of a key-wheeled superfecta wager would be as follows:
the number of horses to be boxed with the keyed selection MULTIPLIED by the next lowest number MULTIPLIED by the next lowest number MULTIPLIED by the dollar amount of the wager. EXAMPLE: A key-wheeled superfecta wager using 4 choices with the key-wheeled selection for $2 would be computed 4 (number of horses boxed with the key-wheeled selection) x 3 (next highest number) x 2 (next highest number) x 2 (dollar amount of the wager) = $48.

Wheeling a selection in a daily double bet means wagering a selection in one leg (part) of the bet with all betting choices in the other leg (part) of the bet in order to cover all possibilities of finish. If the selection is the winner, the wheeled daily double bet is a winner. The greater the number of betting choices, the greater the cost of covering the wager.

Partial wheeling in a daily double bet means using a number of, but not all, selections in one leg (part) of the bet with a number of, but not all, selections in the other leg (part) of the bet. The greater the number of betting choices, the greater the cost of covering the wager.

A simple rule to remember to compute the cost of a wheeled or partial wheeled daily double wager would be as follows:
The number of horses selected in Leg (part) A MULTIPLIED by the number of horses selected in Leg (part) B MULTIPLIED by the dollar amount of the wager. EXAMPLE: If 4 choices were selected in Leg (part) A and 6 choices were selected in Leg (part) B and the wager was made for $5, the cost would be computed 4 (selections in Leg A) x 6 (selections in Leg B) x 5 (dollar amount of wager) = $120.

Partial wheeling selections in a Pick-3 bet means using a number of selections in each leg (part) of the wager in order to cover a greater number of possibilities of finish. The more numbers used in each or any leg, the greater the number of possibilities covered. However, the more numbers used, the greater the cost to cover the wager.

A simple rule to remember to compute the cost of a wheeled or partial-wheeled Pick-3 wager would be as follows: The number of horses selected in Leg (part) A MULTIPLIED by the number of horses selected in Leg (part) B MULTIPLIED by the number of horses selected in Leg (part) C MULTIPLIED by the dollar amount of the wager. EXAMPLE: If 2 choices were selected in Leg (part) A, 6 choices were selected in Leg (part) B, and 3 choices were selected in Leg (part) C, and the wager was made for $2, the cost would be computed 2 (selections in Leg A) x 6 (selections in Leg B) x 3 (selections in Leg C) x 2 ( dollar amount of wager )= $72.

Partial wheeling selections in a Pick-6 bet means using a number of selections in each leg (part) of the wager in order to cover a greater number of possibilities of finish. The more numbers used in each or any leg, the greater the number of possibilities covered. However, the more numbers used, the greater the cost to cover the wager.

A simple rule to remember to compute the cost of a wheeled or partial-wheeled Pick-6 wager would be as follows: The number of horses selected in Leg (part) A MULTIPLIED by the number of horses selected in Leg (part) B MULTIPLIED by the number of horses selected in Leg (part) C MULTIPLIED by the number of horses selected in Leg (part) D MULTIPLIED by the number of horses selected in Leg (part) E MULTIPLIED by the number of horses selected in Leg (part) F MULTIPLIED by the dollar amount of the wager. EXAMPLE: If 2 choices were selected in Leg (part) A, 2 choices were selected in Leg (part) B, 2 choices were selected in Leg (part) C, 2 choices were selected in Leg (part) D, 2 choices were selected in Leg (part) E, and 2 choices were selected in Leg (part) F, and the wager was made for $2, the cost would be computed 2 (selections in Leg A) x 2 (selections in Leg B) x 2 (selections in Leg C) x 2 (selections in Leg D) x 2 (selections in Leg E) x 2 (selections in Leg F) x 2 (dollar amount of wager) = $128.

Partial wheeling selections in a Pick-4 bet means using a number of selections in each leg (part) of the wager in order to cover a greater number of possibilities of finish. The more numbers used in each or any leg, the greater the number of possibilities covered. However, the more numbers used, the greater the cost to cover the wager.

A simple rule to remember to compute the cost of a wheeled or partial-wheeled Pick-4 wager would be as follows:
The number of horses selected in Leg (part) A MULTIPLIED by the number of horses selected in Leg (part) B MULTIPLIED by the number of horses selected in Leg (part) C MULTIPLIED by the number of horses selected in Leg (part) D MULTIPLIED by the dollar amount of the wager. EXAMPLE: If 2 choices were selected in Leg (part) A, 6 choices were selected in Leg (part) B, 3 choices were selected in Leg (part) C, and 2 choices were selected in Leg (part) D, and the wager was made for $2, the cost would be computed 2 (selections in Leg A) x 6 (selections in Leg B) x 3 (selections in Leg C) x 2 (selections in Leg D) x 2 (dollar amount of wager) = $144.
Partial Wheeling selections in a quinella bet means using a number of selections in combination with a chosen winner in order to cover a greater number of possibilities of finish. The more numbers used, the greater number of possibilities covered. However, the more numbers used, the greater the cost to cover the wager.

Wheeling selections in a quinella bet means using all of the remaining selections in combination with a chosen winner in order to cover all combinations of possible finish. The more numbers used, the greater number of possibilities covered. However, the more numbers used, the greater the cost to cover the wager.

A simple rule to remember to compute the cost of a wheeled or partial-wheeled quinella bet would be as follows: The number of selections to be used with a chosen winner MULTIPLIED by the dollar amount of the wager equals the cost of the wager. EXAMPLE: If 5 choices are used in combination with a chosen winner and the wager was made for $5, the cost would be computed 5 ( selections ) x 5 ( dollar amount of wager ) = $25.

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